Library Sindh Study FG Study quiz Punjab Study
PakStudy :Yours Study Matters

Living in Sweden

Offline AKBAR

  • *****
  • 3957
  • +1/-1
  • Gender: Male
    • pak study
Living in Sweden
« on: January 08, 2009, 08:17:42 PM »
Living in Sweden

Sweden is an open, multicultural society with a long tradition of welcoming students from abroad.

Currently, some 28,000 foreign students are studying in Sweden, making for a vibrant, international study environment. Swedes have some peculiar cultural traits, but they are deeply proud of having built a society that promotes equality between the sexes, tolerance and inclusiveness.

As a student in Sweden, you will have ample opportunity to make new friends. A good part of your social life will revolve around your student union. The union can often help you with finding accommodation and other practical matters. Do make sure you are covered by adequate health insurance while in Sweden.

You will probably need to get a residence permit or visa, maybe even before you arrive in Sweden. To get a residence permit, you need to show you have sufficient funds to pay for living expenses in Sweden. But there are ways in which you can mitigate the financial strain: Sweden allows students to work for the duration of their studies.
...................


Common Alternative Spellings and Misspellings of:
</br> Living in Sweden Living in Sweden,  LLiving in Sweden, Liiving in Sweden, Livving in Sweden, Liviing in Sweden, Livinng in Sweden, Livingg in Sweden, Living  in Sweden, Living iin Sweden, Living inn Sweden, Living in  Sweden, Living in SSweden, Living in Swweden, Living in Sweeden, Living in Swedden, Living in Swedeen, Living in Swedenn,  iving in Sweden, Lving in Sweden, Liing in Sweden, Livng in Sweden, Livig in Sweden, Livin in Sweden, Livingin Sweden, Living n Sweden, Living i Sweden, Living inSweden, Living in weden, Living in Seden, Living in Swden, Living in Sween, Living in Swedn, Living in Swede,  Living in Sweden, iLving in Sweden, Lviing in Sweden, Liivng in Sweden, Livnig in Sweden, Livign in Sweden, Livin gin Sweden, Livingi n Sweden, Living ni Sweden, Living i nSweden, Living inS weden, Living in wSeden, Living in Sewden, Living in Swdeen, Living in Sweedn, Living in Swedne,  Common Alternative Spellings and Misspellings of:
</br> Study Abroad  Study Abroad ,  SStudy Abroad , Sttudy Abroad , Stuudy Abroad , Studdy Abroad , Studyy Abroad , Study  Abroad , Study AAbroad , Study Abbroad , Study Abrroad , Study Abrooad , Study Abroaad , Study Abroadd , Study Abroad  ,  tudy Abroad , Sudy Abroad , Stdy Abroad , Stuy Abroad , Stud Abroad , StudyAbroad , Study broad , Study Aroad , Study Aboad , Study Abrad , Study Abrod , Study Abroa , Study Abroad,  Study Abroad , tSudy Abroad , Sutdy Abroad , Stduy Abroad , Stuyd Abroad , Stud yAbroad , StudyA broad , Study bAroad , Study Arboad , Study Aborad , Study Abraod , Study Abroda , Study Abroa d,  Common Alternative Spellings and Misspellings of:
</br> Study in Sweden  Study in Sweden ,  SStudy in Sweden , Sttudy in Sweden , Stuudy in Sweden , Studdy in Sweden , Studyy in Sweden , Study  in Sweden , Study iin Sweden , Study inn Sweden , Study in  Sweden , Study in SSweden , Study in Swweden , Study in Sweeden , Study in Swedden , Study in Swedeen , Study in Swedenn , Study in Sweden  ,  tudy in Sweden , Sudy in Sweden , Stdy in Sweden , Stuy in Sweden , Stud in Sweden , Studyin Sweden , Study n Sweden , Study i Sweden , Study inSweden , Study in weden , Study in Seden , Study in Swden , Study in Sween , Study in Swedn , Study in Swede , Study in Sweden,  Study in Sweden , tSudy in Sweden , Sutdy in Sweden , Stduy in Sweden , Stuyd in Sweden , Stud yin Sweden , Studyi n Sweden , Study ni Sweden , Study i nSweden , Study inS weden , Study in wSeden , Study in Sewden , Study in Swdeen , Study in Sweedn , Study in Swedne , Study in Swede n, 

Offline AKBAR

  • *****
  • 3957
  • +1/-1
  • Gender: Male
    • pak study
Some cultural peculiarities about Sweden
« Reply #1 on: January 08, 2009, 08:18:55 PM »
Some cultural peculiarities about Sweden

Every country has its own distinctive characteristics. What you find most peculiar about Sweden will obviously depend on your own cultural background. Sweden has long been an open and accepting society and international influences have shaped and enriched Swedish culture.

 

As in all cultures, however, many old customs and usages remain; foreigners may at times find these unusual, puzzling or even amusing.

Swedes are generally held to be punctual, law abiding and respectful of rules and regulations. Smoking, for instance, is not permitted in public places such as restaurants, banks, post offices or in shops. These restrictions are respected. When Swedes wait for something they form queues.

Queuing systems have been installed in many larger shops and most banks and post offices. Customers take numbered tickets from a dispensing machine and wait until their number comes up on a display. Bank clerks will simply ignore you if you don't have a queue ticket. If you're in a large store and there is no queue, look for tickets and a number display. This may seem strange at first but it usually ensures quicker service.

The habit of forming queues may in part stem from the importance attached to egalitarianism in Swedish political thought and practice which, in turn, has permeated most aspects of Swedish society. This is reflected in the large number of women represented in parliament and government but is also apparent in everyday occupations.

For example, people are normally expected to pay for their share when eating out with colleagues or friends, and tend to calculate the exact amount they owe. As a foreign woman you may be surprised to find that your Swedish date does not offer to pay for you. By the same token, Swedish women may insist on paying for themselves. However, many Swedish women still respond positively to a bit of old-fashioned courtship. On the other hand, it is not unusual for men and women to form friendships without being romantically involved.

At first, you may find Swedes a bit difficult to get to know. They may seem distant and reserved. But they can also make loyal friends once you get to know them. As a student living in a student dormitory with access to various student activities, you will have ample opportunity to make friends.

Swedes generally like hobbies and activities and pursuing them together with others is probably the easiest way to meet and get to know new people. If invited to someone's home it is customary to take off your shoes, especially in winter. This custom is upheld more strictly in smaller towns and rural areas. Nevertheless, to be on the safe side, it may be a good idea to ask. It is also customary to be on time when invited to a dinner party. Eight o’clock means eight o’clock.

Most people moving to a new country usually find many things confusing or strange at first. This will probably be true of your first time in Sweden. Remember, however, that if there is anything you are unsure of the best thing to do is to ask someone. Swedes are informal and willing to help. This is especially true of young people and students, many of whom have traveled widely themselves.
................................