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Education in Afghanistan (Afghan school girls)

Offline iram

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Education in Afghanistan (Afghan school girls)
« on: April 20, 2008, 02:40:32 PM »
Education in Afghanistan

:: School students in Afghanistan.

Education in Afghanistan was significantly improved under the rule of King Zahir Shah (from 1933 to 1973),[1] making primary schools available to about half the population who were younger than 12 years of age, and expanding the secondary school system and the national university at Kabul.[citation needed] Despite those improvements, large percent of the population remained illiterate.[1] Beginning with the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan in 1979, successive wars virtually destroyed the education system.[1] Most teachers fled the country during the wars.[1] By the middle of the 1990s, only about 650 schools were functioning.[1]

:: School girls in 2002.

In 1996 the Taliban regime banned education for females, and the madrassa (mosque school) became the main source of primary and secondary education.[1] After the overthrow of the Taliban in 2001, the interim government received substantial international aid to restore the education system.[1] In 2003 some 7,000 schools were operating in 20 of the 34 provinces, with 27,000 teachers teaching 4.2 million children (including 1.2 million girls).[1] Of that number, about 3.9 million were in primary schools.[1] When Kabul University reopened in 2002, some 24,000 students, male and female, enrolled.[1] Five other universities were being rehabilitated in the early 2000s.[1] Since the end of the dogmatic Taliban era in 2001, public school curricula have included religious subjects, but detailed instruction is left to religious teachers.[1] In 2003 an estimated 57 percent of men and 86 percent of women were illiterate, and the lack of skilled and educated workers was a major economic disadvantage.[1]

By 2006, over 4 million male and female students were enrolled in schools throughout Afghanistan. At the same time school facilities or institutions were also being improved, with more modern-style schools being built each year.

:: Afghan school girls

However, there are still significant obstacles to education in Afghanistan, many of which stem from a lack of funding. Planning curricula and school programs is difficult for the Ministry of Education because a significant amount of the budget for education comes from varying external donors each year, making it difficult to predict what the annual budget will be.[2] The obstacles to education are even more numerous for Afghan girls. Afghanistan's Education Minister, Hanif Atmar, said in 2007 that 60% of students were studying in tents or other unprotected structures, and some Afghan parents refused to let their daughters attend schools in such conditions.[2] A lack of women teachers is another issue that concerns some Afghan parents, especially in more conservative areas. Some parents will not allow their daughters to be taught by men. But this often means that girls are not allowed to attend school, as the international aid agency Oxfam reported in 2007 that at that time only about one quarter of Afghan teachers were women.

Offline leeran

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Re: Education in Afghanistan (Afghan school girls)
« Reply #1 on: April 27, 2008, 11:59:28 PM »
hello irum i want to know about your eduction?

Offline iram

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Re: Education in Afghanistan (Afghan school girls)
« Reply #2 on: April 28, 2008, 02:03:04 PM »
aoa
a am Fa

Offline shanti

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Re: Education in Afghanistan (Afghan school girls)
« Reply #3 on: April 28, 2008, 05:48:39 PM »
hello irum i want to know about your eduction?